Plastic surgery may not make you better looking – but guess which TWO facial treatments are the GOLD standard

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Those of us who go under the knife may ultimately look younger after treatment – but it won’t necessarily improve our looks.

That’s according to a small study that suggests that anti-ageing facial cosmetic treatments are bang on when it comes to turning back the clock on the ravages of time but they cannot guarantee success in the attractiveness stakes.

Apparently, in the study, 50 people were asked to guess the age and then comment on the appeal of 49 patients in a series of ‘before or after’ photos.

It concluded that although it made them look younger, it didn’t necessarily make them more appealing.

Of course, our expectations of what surgery can achieve are a big factor in this study.

But, according to consultant plastic surgeon Marc Pacifico, the best age-defying treatments continue to be all about the face.

He claims that when it comes to looking youthful: ‘The two most popular plastic surgery procedures that produce reliable and natural results are upper eyelid lifts and facelifts.’

He adds: ‘These two gold standard facial rejuvenation treatments that are unsurpassed by anything else!’

Reassurance indeed!

Previously, a study found that the self-esteem of those of us post face lift were hard to judge, leaving scientists perplexed about the lack of correlation between positive effect of the surgical outcome and how a patient felt about themselves – even though, on average, people felt 8.9 years younger after surgery.

Now, a new study hopes to discover just how women feel about their face with age.

An Australian university wants feedback from women over 35 for their ‘Face Esteem’ research project.

With the popularity for cosmetic treatments continuing to rise, they hope to discover why some of us seek cosmetic procedures to iron out wrinkles and improve sagging skin, and why some of us don’t.

For more information, visit www.surveymonkey.com/r/faceesteem or contact Odette Norton on Odette.norton@research.usc.edu.au.

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